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Tobacco Prevention and Control Branch

Data: Adult Facts and Statistics: NC BRFSS

The NC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (NC BRFSS) (NC BRFSS) is a comprehensive telephone survey of adults ages 18 and older. Every year a core set of tobacco questions are asked. In addition, tobacco modules on topics such as other tobacco products and counseling can be added. View reports from the NC BRFSS below:

2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

Tobacco Use

Secondhand Smoke Policy

Tobacco Use Prevention

TRU Campaign

In the last 12 months, have you heard about or seen the North Carolina TRU (or Tobacco. Reality. Unfiltered.) media campaign directed at preventing tobacco use among youth?

Quit Now

A telephone quitline is a free telephone-based service that connects people who smoke cigarettes or use tobacco products with trained quit coaches who can help them quit. Have you heard of the North Carolina Tobacco Use Quitline at 1-800-QuitNow or the website, QuitlineNC.org as a resource to help tobacco users quit?

Other Tobacco Products

In situations where you can not smoke, do you currently use any of the following products- chewing tobacco, snuff, snus, nicotine water, dissolvable tobacco products such as orbs or strips, or electronic cigarettes?

Smoking Cessation

In the past 12 months, did any doctor, dentist, nurse, or other health professional advise you to quit smoking cigarettes or using any other tobacco products?

2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

Tobacco Use

Secondhand Smoke

Smoking Cessation

Other Tobacco Products

During the past 30 days, did you smoke cigars, cigarillos, also known as little cigars or "blacks"?

Tobacco Use Prevention

The North Carolina tax on a pack of cigarettes is currently 45 cents and the national average is $1.42. Would you favor or oppose raising North Carolina's cigarette tax to $1.00 if part of the tax revenue was used was used to help reduce smoking?

Quit Now

A telephone quitline is a free telephone-based service that connects people who smoke cigarettes or use tobacco products with trained quit coaches who can help them quit. Have you heard of the North Carolina Tobacco Use Quitline at 1-800-QuitNow or the website, QuitlineNC.org?

Data prior to 2011

Changes to the BRFSS Survey Methodology

Beginning in 2011, the Division of Behavioral Surveillance (DBS) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention made two major changes to the BRFSS Survey methodology. These changes were designed to improve the accuracy of BRFSS estimates; however the results using these new methods are not comparable to BRFSS estimates from previous years1.

The first change is the adoption of an improved weighting method called iterative proportional fitting, commonly referred to as “raking.”  Raking is a technique for weighting the survey data, whereby the weighted respondent data is made more comparable to the characteristics of the target population, such as the proportion of Hispanic adults in the state. Raking improves the representativeness of state estimates by including socio-economic factors, such as education and marital status, in the final survey weights. The former post-stratification methodology, was limited to adjusting the final weights by categories of age, race and sex and is no longer utilized.

The second change is the addition of cell phone interviews to the BRFSS. Adoption of cell phones (with no landline phone) has been particularly evident among younger adults and racial/ethnic minorities. Adding cell phone interviews improves the BRFSS coverage of these groups.

As a result of these changes, the BRFSS will better represent lower-income and minority populations and provide more accurate prevalence estimates. However, it will no longer be possible to compare results from 2011 or later BRFSS surveys to results from earlier years of BRFSS data.  It is also likely that prevalence estimates will be somewhat higher as a result of the change in methods for behaviors that are more common among younger adults and/or minorities.

1 Pierannunzi, C., Town, M., Garvin, W., Shaw, F and Balluz, L. "Methodologic Changes in the Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System in 2011 and Potential Effects on Prevalence Estimates," Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report; 2012 June; 61(22): 410-413. Available on CDC's website. Accessed September 12, 2012.

TPCB Research and Data Information